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Posted May 30, 2012 by admin in Finance
 
 

Speeding costs more than it’s worth

speeding
speeding

The warm weather and long days are here, which brings open windows, loud music and long drives to beaches, ball games, concerts or adventurous road trips. Whatever the reason, this time of the year has people driving longer and further on our roads. Too bad gas prices are high, and continue to climb!

An easy way to save at the pump is to visit it less. That doesn’t necessarily mean that you have to use your car less; it just means that you should think about using it differently – don’t speed. You’ll be happy with the savings. It’s that simple.

The fast lane on the highway usually moves around 115-120 kph, even though the speed limit is 100 kph. It’s always tempting to hop into that lane and cruise at a faster speed to reach your destination sooner. But, how much sooner are you really getting there? Why rush there when you can leave a few minutes earlier for the same effect? I know, I know – easier said than done.

But let’s break this down. Say your daily commute is 20km of highway driving. At 120 kph, that takes you 10 minutes. Now, if you dropped your speed down to 100 kph, that commute would now take you… drum roll please… 12 minutes; only 2 minutes longer!

Now, the next time you’re driving on the highway, take a look at your tachometer and notice your engine revving when you’re driving at 100 kph – probably around 2500 rpm for most. However, at 120 kph, your engine is spinning at 3000 rpm or higher. That means your engine is running 20 percent faster and burning 20 percent more fuel.

Living with that 2 minute commute extension will save you (depending of your mix of highway and city driving) up to 20 percent at the pump. So, if you’re filling up after 500 km, you can now enjoy an extra 100 km and fill up each 600 km instead. That’s a good deal, if you ask me. That 2 minutes extension is saving you hundreds per year.

Think about it.

MM